Jul
10
2013

The Palouse Tapestry

A Segment of the Bill Forney Workshop, in the Palouse, WA

(2nd of 7 Posts from this Trip)

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Palouse1The first part of Bill Fortney’s His Light Workshop was for 4 days in the Palouse, in eastern Washington State.  The Palouse is one of the most fertile wheat-growing regions in the world. So you ask why is that important?  Palouse8Because the newly sprouted wheat fields stretch over the rolling hills and valleys for a hundred miles in each direction and present some of the most graphic landscapes I’ve ever seen.  And as such, the Palouse has become one of the most popular photography venues in the northwest.

1-px-x-560-px-background-line-shimSteptoe Butte is the first-stop for the full impact of the Palouse.  Steptoe is one of the only spots from which the vastness of this farmland can be seen.  This was our spot for two (early!) morning shoots and two (fairly late) evening shoots.  The sun rises at this latitude at about 4:45 a.m. and sets around 9:45 p.m. this time of year.  So there was precious little time to sleep, but being there during the pre-dawn and twilight times was a treat.

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Jul
10
2013

Palouse Falls State Park, WA

A Segment of the Bill Forney Workshop, in the Palouse, WA

(3rd of 7 Posts from this Trip)

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Falls2About a two-hour’s drive west of Colfax in Washington’s Palouse region is the Palouse Falls State Park.  We headed out in the afternoon to catch the falls late in the day and at sunset.  Our original plan had been to go out the next morning, but thankfully, we changed that plan.  I’m fairly sure the morning sun angle wouldn’t be as good, and maybe even problematic.

The 186-foot fall is at the back end of a horseshoe canyon on the Palouse River.  Access to shoot the falls is about as easy as any I’ve seen with several vantages that offer good angles on the falls adjacent to the parking lot.  However, after seeing some of the shots taken by others from the more northern edge, I wish I’d taken the short hike around to that side.  That spot gives a much wider angle on not only the falls, but also the entire downstream canyon.  But as usual, I learned a lesson for next time.

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Jul
10
2013

Waterfall Learning

A Segment of the Bill Forney Workshop In Mt. Rainier National Park, WA

(4th of 7 Posts from this Trip)

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1x570-LtGreyRainier2On my recent Washington State workshop trip with Bill Fortney, Matt Kloskowski and the His Light team,  we made a one-night stop at Mt. Rainier to break up the long east-west drive across the entire state.

Rainier8Unfortunately, the weather didn’t cooperate very much with drizzle and cloud-cover obscuring Rainier (the mountain) all but a few minutes on the morning we departed the Paradise Inn (our lodging for the night).

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Rainier4But, the drive up and down did give us an opportunity to capture some streams and some wonderful waterfalls.  I haven’t done much in the way of waterfall and flowing water photography other than in abstracts, so this was a great opportunity to use some of the tips that Bill and Matt had given the group on capturing moving water.1-px-x-560-px-background-line-shim

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